Mr. Turton, the Collector, issues invitations to numerous Indian gentlemen

Mr. Turton, the Collector, issues invitations to numerous Indian gentlemen in the neighborhood for the Bridge Party. While he argues with Mr. Ram Chand and the elderly and distinguished Nawab Bahadur, Mahmoud Ali claims that the Bridge Party is due to actions from the Lieutenant Governor, for Turton would never do this unless compelled. The… Continue reading Mr. Turton, the Collector, issues invitations to numerous Indian gentlemen

Description of Chandrapore, a city along that Ganges

Forster begins A Passage to India with a short description of Chandrapore, a city along that Ganges that is not notable except for the nearby Marabar caves. Chandrapore is a city of gardens with few fine houses from the imperial period of Upper India; it is primarily a “forest sparsely scattered with huts.” The first… Continue reading Description of Chandrapore, a city along that Ganges

A Passage to India, however, belies this statement, as it remains relevant

E. M. Forster was part of the intellectual Bloomsbury group, which flourished in London just before and after World War I. Educated at Cambridge, as were many of the group, Forster became one of England’s leading novelists during the prewar Edwardian period. His Bloomsbury friends included biographer Lytton Strachey, novelist Virginia Woolf, art critic Clive… Continue reading A Passage to India, however, belies this statement, as it remains relevant

Is it possible for the Indians to be friends with the English?

“Is it possible for the Indians to be friends with the English?” — is the focal point of the plot of A Passage to India. Can East meet West on a plane where each not only tolerates but also appreciates the other? In a larger sense Forster asks if universal understanding is possible. (It should… Continue reading Is it possible for the Indians to be friends with the English?

Susan sets off with Elizabeth-Jane for Casterbridge

Eighteen years have passed. Two women, Susan Henchard, dressed in the mourning clothes of a widow, and her now-grown daughter, Elizabeth-Jane, walk along the same stretch of road toward Weydon-Priors. As the two make their way toward the fairgrounds, they speak of the sailor, Newson, whom Elizabeth-Jane believes to be her father, and his recent… Continue reading Susan sets off with Elizabeth-Jane for Casterbridge

Michael Henchard, the “Man of Character”

Many critics believe that Michael Henchard, the “Man of Character” to whom the subtitle of The Mayor of Casterbridge refers, is one of Thomas Hardy’s greatest creations. Henchard is constructed with a great deal of ethical and psychological complexity, and the first two chapters show some of the contradictions of his character. As a young… Continue reading Michael Henchard, the “Man of Character”

Story of Michael Henchard and his wife Susan

The first chapter starts with a young hay-trusser named Michael Henchard, his wife, Susan, and their baby daughter, Elizabeth-Jane, silently walk along a road in the English countryside toward a large village called Weydon-Priors. They meet a turnip-hoer, and Henchard asks if there is work or shelter to be found in the town. The pessimistic… Continue reading Story of Michael Henchard and his wife Susan

Biography of Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy was born June 2, 1840, in the village of Upper Bockhampton, located in Southwestern England. His father was a stone mason and a violinist. His mother enjoyed reading and relating all the folk songs and legends of the region. Between his parents, Hardy gained all the interests that would appear in his novels… Continue reading Biography of Thomas Hardy